Do I Need Planning Permission To Add A Single Story Sunroom To My Home?

Planning Permission To Add A Single Story Sunroom

I am guessing you like the landscape around you and want to enjoy the most of it. So you are considering adding a view to your home, office or whatever building it is you have in mind. A sunroom is your best bet and it’s a structure normally attached to the side of a house. It lets you to admire and enjoy the environs and the views and at the same time sheltered and safe from wind, rain and other weather conditions. Sunrooms have large windows to allow panoramic views of the outdoors while the sun gets through and fills the room with warmth and light.

sunroom, Planning Permission To Add A Single Story Sunroom

Sunrooms in Scotland

There are many types of designs for the sunroom. It can be built out of a variation of materials. For example, you can have a brick sunroom if you like a rustic décor. You can also construct it out of wood for a feeling of warmth and luxury or, if you want to highlight the views, you can make it out of glass. The roof can also be made out of glass so you can appreciate the sky and revel in the weather without the actual discomfort of cold or hot weather conditions.

There were numerous formal conservatories in Scotland, and so sunrooms are not a rare or new home improvement idea. The 1960s marked the advent of professional re-modelling of houses to add sunroom elements to new and existing structures. And ever since, more people have added lovely sunrooms to their buildings. If like most people you admire and want the same extension for your home, and want to know if you need planning permission. Then this is for you…

Sunroom Planning Permission in Great Britain

Building planning and building in Britain is a process that is monitored properly by relevant authorities in the government. So do you need planning permission to add that superb sunroom to your building? Well, the answer to that question is yes.

In Britain, there are regulations for constructing single storey sunrooms. And these regulations must be adhered to so as to avoid penalties from the government. Currently in Britain, the Neighbourhood Consultation Scheme is ongoing (30 May, 2013 – 30 May 2016). Under this scheme, new regulations have been drawn up to guide the construction of sunrooms and other types of building extensions. The scheme operates in three phases:

  1. You notify the local planning authority of your intended sunroom.
  1. The planning authority contacts neighbours in adjoining properties and notifies them of your intended building extension.
  1. Neighbours can object to the extension within 21 days if they are not pleased with it.

Passing these three phases does not actually guarantee your sunroom would stand. The local planning authorities have guidelines that regulate the construction of building extensions such as sunrooms. The most important of these regulations is the area that a sunroom or any other building extension can take up. Which is 4 – 8 meters for detached buildings and 3 – 6 meters for other buildings. Also, single storey sun rooms must not be greater than the longest part of the roof of the main building. A single storey rear extension’s height should not be more than 4m. A forward extension of the main or side elevation should not be facing a major road.

The regulations mentioned in the previous paragraph, are just some of the major guidelines. To get more information, please contact Space Kube. And we would be of great assistance to you.

 

 

 

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